Nikon SLR Cameras »



Nikon D3S Review

Nikon D3S Review

Webmaster April 13, 2012 0

Nikon announced the D3S in October 2009, as a replacement for its 2007-issued Nikon D3. The D3S is a full-frame, professional-grade dSLR and retails for a suggested price of $5,199, as of March 2012.

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Nikon D700 Review

Nikon D700 Review

Webmaster April 13, 2012 0

The Nikon D700 was Nikon Corporation’s second full-frame dSLR camera. Nikon introduced the D700 in 2008 as a replacement for its Nikon D300, but it also serves as a lower-cost version of the Nikon

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Nikon D5100 Review

Nikon D5100 Review

Webmaster August 23, 2011 1

Nikon announced the Nikon D5100 in April 2011 as an upgrade to its Nikon D5000. The D5100 is designed as a mid-level dSLR for photo enthusiasts, but many of its features rival the more

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Nikon D3100 Review

Nikon D3100 Review

Webmaster August 23, 2011 0

Nikon introduced the D3100 in August 2010 as an upgrade to its D3000. The D3100 was created as a budget-priced dSLR for entry-level photographers. Although the D3000 entered the marketplace only one year earlier,

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Nikon D40 Review

Nikon D40 Review

Webmaster August 22, 2011 0

The Nikon D40 was introduced in 2006 as a trimmed-down, lower-priced version of its D50. The D40 entered the marketplace at a price of US $599, about US $300 cheaper than its D50 predecessor.

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Nikon D5000 Review

Nikon D5000 Review

Webmaster April 20, 2010 0

The Nikon D5000 12.3MP DX digital SLR is essentially a Nikon D90DX packed into a smaller body, similar to the old Nikon D40. It is a compact and powerful entry level digital SLR that

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Nikon D3000 Review

Nikon D3000 Review

Webmaster April 20, 2010 0

With the Nikon D3000 10.2MP DX Digital SLR, Nikon continued its tradition of offering a digital SLR that appeals to the consumer market of photographers who do not seek advanced features or controls, but

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Nikon D90 Review

Nikon D90 Review

Webmaster April 20, 2010 0

The Nikon D90 DX 12.3MP Digital SLR Camera replaced the older Nikon D80 model. While it boasts a similar build and style to older Nikon “D series” SLRs, it offers a variety of new

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Nikon D7000 Review

Nikon D7000 Review

Webmaster February 23, 2010 0

The Nikon D7000 entered the marketplace in 2010 as an upgrade to the Nikon D90. As of February 2012, the D7000 sells for as low as US $970 and consumers can buy the D90

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About Nikon SLR Cameras

Although film SLR has been around for many years, the first practical digital SLR was only introduced into the market as recent as 1999 – the Nikon D1. It had good enough image quality for print (2.7 MP), was fast enough (4.5 FPS) and functionally sensible enough to be used as a replacement for a film SLR. It’s also the first DSLR made with Nikon electronics, based on a Nikon film camera body. However, priced at $5,000, it was affordable only to some professionals. In the world of digital cameras things move so fast, that cameras get obsolete in a very short space of time. A new (2011) D5100 for $800 has far better image quality than that first Nikon D1, in spite of the latter being 4 times more expensive.

One can distinguish between two generations of DSLR’s from Nikon: Generation 1 from 1999 to 2008, and Generation 2, which actually started in 2007. The difference between these two generations is so significant that the cheapest Gen 2 camera, the D90, can make better pictures than the best Generation 1 camera, the D2Xs. Nikon’s first generation of digital SLRs started with the D1 series of 1999, followed by the D2 series, the D40, D40x, D50, D70, D70s, D80, D100 and D200, up until 2008. These cameras had only elementary picture and white balance adjustments, including an Optimize Image menu with crude controls allowing only options of “Enhance (+)” or “Moderate (-)” for saturation, and WB trims that extend only to 3. Getting a perfect picture was really a challenge and only achieved by real professionals.

With the introduction of Nikon’s Adaptive Dynamic Range (ADR) we have the dawn of the second generation cameras, which were introduced into the market in 2007 with the D3 and D300. The ADR made significantly better real image quality possible. ADR allows Gen 2 cameras to render most real scenes much closer to the way we see them with our own eyes, without added contrast, blown highlights and blocked shadows common on film and Generation 1 cameras for most people. The D90 has ADR on by default, and in the case of the D3, D700 and D300 it had to be turned on in the menus.

Gen 2 cameras also are Nikon’s first cameras to allow a full range of saturation and other image adjustments. Saturation and other values are set in direct units of up to 3, set in the Picture Control menus. The following features also contribute towards taking excellent pictures: WB trims which extend 6 units in each direction and manual preset WB storage settings (complete with icons and notes) Increased in-camera processing has become the order of the day and getting beautiful pictures has now become so much easier. These cameras also boast super-sharp new 3″ LCD screens.

Through the mid-2000s Nikon sales were overshadowed by that of Canon, but they regained much of their reputation among professional and amateur enthusiast photographers as a leading innovator in the field, especially because of the speed, ergonomics, and low-light performance of its latest models. The mid-range Nikon D90, introduced in 2008, was also the first SLR camera to record video. Since then video mode has been introduced to many more of the Nikon DSLR cameras, even the entry-level ones. A wide range of digital SLR cameras are available (2011): High-end (professional), DX-sensor, high speed: NIKON D2 HS; high-end (prosumer) DX sensor: NIKON D300S; Mid-range: Nikon D7000; Upper-entry-level: Nikon D5100; Entry-level (consumer): Nikon D3100.